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Is Your Vehicle Part Of the Takata Airbag Recall?

Background On Takata Airbags

In November 2014, following an investigation of Takata airbags, the U.S. Department of Transportation and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) ordered a nationwide recall of Takata airbags installed in vehicles from model years 2002-2015. Prior to announcing the recall, NHTSA’s investigation determined that the ammonium nitrate-based propellant used in these airbags may degrade. The combination of time, high temperature fluctuations, and humidity contribute to the degradation of the propellant in the inflators. The degraded propellant can cause the inflator to rupture during airbag deployment. In the event of an inflator rupture, metal fragments could pass through the airbag cushion material, striking the vehicle occupant(s), resulting in serious injury or death. NHTSA prioritized the recalled airbag inflators based on a risk of injury or death to vehicle occupants. Recalled airbags are structured into one of three geographic zones based on temperature & humidity. 

Takata Airbag Recall By Region



What Zone are you in

Based on the zone that you live in, determines when your vehicle will have the parts available for the recall.  Zone A – States with high temperature cycling and humidity (includes Puerto Rico, Guam, Samoa, Saipan, and U.S. Virgin Islands). Time in service until significant propellant degradation may occur is projected at between 6-9 years. Zone B – States that have moderate temperature cycling and humidity. Time in service until significant propellant degradation may occur is projected at between 10-15 years.  Zone C – States with lower temperature cycling and humidity. Time in service until significant propellant degradation may occur is projected at between 15-20 years. Since November 2014, NHTSA has expanded the Takata airbag inflator recall several times. In December 2016, the Takata airbag recall was expanded again and, by December 31, 2019, will include an estimated 35-40 million inflators. This is on top of the 28.8 million inflators previously recalled. NHTSA developed a schedule for recalled airbags timed before the propellant in the inflator degrades to the point of becoming dangerous

Takata Airbag Recall

How To Check To See If Your Vehicle Is Affected By The Takata Airbag Recall

The process is very simple, the one thing that you need is your Vehicles Identification Number(VIN) to get started.  So navigate to https://www.nhtsa.gov/recalls and enter your 17 digital VIN.
NHTSA Recall Page

Once you enter a valid VIN You will get a page that looks like this to show if you have a recall or not.

NHTSA Recall
In this scenario, the vehicle does not have a recall as it shows “0 Recalls”.  In this case, your vehicle has no current open recalls, today.  Why do I say that, because NHTSA is updating the list from the manufacturers on a daily basis, so if you suspect your vehicle has a recall you would have to check this site regularly.  I’ve seen in the past, vehicles within a 12-hour period go from 0 recalls to 5 or more recalls. So Always check this site.
If your vehicle is affected by the recall, call your dealership to get the recall done ASAP.  Remember all Recall are free to you!
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